Orange Ice Cream

This award-winning Orange Ice Cream recipe is made with fresh squeezed orange juice and makes the most delicious treat on a hot summer’s day.

When I say this Orange Ice Cream recipe is “award winning”, it’s the truth! When I was a young girl, my Aunt Judy entered it into a contest at Lagoon, in Utah and won the first place ribbon!  She shared the recipe with my mom and it was one of my favorite frozen desserts as a child. The creamy orange flavor is amazing and so refreshing, plus it couldn’t be easier to make.

How to make Orange Ice Cream:

  • Add orange juice, lemon juice and sugar to a mixing bowl and stir well to combine. Taste and add a little more sugar if it’s not sweet enough. Whisk in cream and orange Jello. Freeze/churn according to ice cream maker instructions.

A liquid measuring cup with freshly squeezed orange juice next to a mixing bowl with cream and sugar.

  • *If using a modern electric ice cream maker (here’s the one I used in recipe testing) freeze the bowl of the ice cream maker overnight and refrigerate the liquid mixture for several hours (or overnight), before churning.
  • Store in the freezer for 1-2 weeks, in an airtight container with a piece if plastic wrap against the surface to help keep it from crystalizing.

Orange Ice cream churning in an ice cream maker, then poured into a loaf pan.

 Variations:

  • Lemon ice cream: replace orange juice with lemon juice. Add additional sugar to sweeten, to taste. Add zest from lemon. Replace orange jello with lemon jello.
  • Lime ice cream: replace orange juice with lime juice. Add additional sugar to sweeten, as needed, to taste. Add zest from lime. Replace orange jello with lime jello.

How to make Ice Cream without an Ice Cream Maker:

Divide cold ice cream mixture between two gallon resealable bags (I like to double bag them for extra protection).  Place the bags in a large bowl or container that has a lid. Fill the bowl, around the bags, with ice and some ice cream rock salt. Secure the lid to the container. Shake well (get the kids to help!) for at least 20 minutes, until thickened. Return to freezer for a few hours, until set.

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Orange Ice Cream

This award-winning Orange Ice Cream recipe is made with fresh squeezed orange juice and makes the most delicious treat on a hot summer’s day.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Refrigeration and Churn 1 day
Total Time 1 day 15 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 313kcal
Author Lauren Allen

Equipment

  • Ice Cream Maker

Ingredients

  • 2 ¼ cups fresh squeezed orange juice (6-8 oranges)
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar (or more if needed, if oranges are not overly sweet)
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 Tablespoon orange Jello*

Instructions

  • Add orange juice, lemon juice and sugar to a mixing bowl and stir well to combine. Taste and add a little more sugar if it’s not sweet enough. Whisk in cream and orange Jello.
  • Freeze/churn according to ice cream maker instructions. *If using a modern electric ice cream maker (that doesn’t require ice/salt) freeze the bowl of the ice cream maker overnight and refrigerate the liquid mixture for several hours (or overnight), before churning. Both need to be completely chilled.
  • Store in the freezer for 1-2 weeks, in an airtight container with a piece if plastic wrap against the surface to help keep it from crystalizing.

Video

Notes

*Makes about 4 cups of ice cream.

Jello: You could substitute ½-1 teaspoon orange oil, in place of Jello. (When I reached out to Judy, she said she now prefers orange oil, for flavor).

Cream: You could substitute half and half but the ice cream wont be as thick and creamy. 

Variations:

  • Lemon ice cream: replace orange juice with lemon juice. Add additional sugar to sweeten, to taste. Add zest from lemon. Replace orange jello with lemon jello.
    Lime ice cream: replace orange juice with lime juice. Add additional sugar to sweeten, as needed, to taste. Add zest from lime. Replace orange jello with lime jello.

Ice Cream Maker: I used this Cuisinart Ice Cream Maker to test this recipe.  

To make without an Ice Cream Maker:  Divide cold ice cream mixture between two  gallon zip lock bags (I also like to double bag them for extra protection).  Place the bags in a large bowl or container that has a lid. Fill the bowl, around the bags, with ice and some ice cream rock salt. Secure the lid to the container. Shake well (get the kids to help!) for at least 20 minutes, until thickened. Return to freezer for a few hours, until set.

Nutrition

Calories: 313kcal | Carbohydrates: 29g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 22g | Saturated Fat: 14g | Cholesterol: 82mg | Sodium: 28mg | Potassium: 184mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 25g | Vitamin A: 1014IU | Vitamin C: 36mg | Calcium: 46mg | Iron: 1mg
HAVE YOU TRIED THIS RECIPE?!

RATE and COMMENT below! I would love to hear your experience.

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The post Orange Ice Cream appeared first on Tastes Better From Scratch.

Homemade Pasta

Let’s make homemade pasta! If you have flour, two eggs, a splash of olive oil, and a bit of salt, you can do it right now. You don’t need special Italian pasta flours to make great homemade pasta, and you don’t need to worry if you don’t have a pasta maker. You can make pasta by hand with a basic rolling pin. I make pasta at home all the time, and this has become my go-to “everyday” recipe. It makes a wonderful, versatile dough that you can roll out into a range of noodles and shapes.

What you’ll find here is my basic pasta dough and process. The basics. Beyond that, I’m going to give you an earful. I’ll walk you through a number of variations and considerations down below. And I’ll include step-by-step pictures of the process of making pasta dough. You can do it by hand, with a stand maker, or with a pasta maker. Homemade pasta is absolutely one of my favorite things to make and I’m consolidating everything I’ve learned about it over the years into this one post along with links to my favorite resources. It’s an ongoing journey for me, so I’ll continue to update this. Enjoy and happy pasta making!

Homemade Pasta Equipment

Let’s start with equipment. I have opinions related to some of the pasta equipment out there and have purchased and used quite a range over the years. My takeaway? In the end, you don’t need much. Certainly not to get started. Start by making your pasta by hand first, and if you’re into it, buy an Marcato Atlas 150 hand-crank pasta maker. I’ve had mine for nearly twenty years, and with a little TLC it should last a lifetime. I make my pasta dough by hand, roll it out with the Atlas.

  • Rolling Pin: If you’re starting out and making pasta by hand, a rolling pin (and a sharp knife to cut the noodles) should do the job. In a pinch, if you’re short the rolling pin, a tall water bottle could do the trick.
  • Pasta Maker: My Atlas 150 pasta maker is a workhorse. You can collect different attachments over time to experiment with different pasta shapes. With a bit of practice it makes rolling pasta dough to uniform thickness a breeze. You’ll need a counter or tabletop to clamp it to. An alternative? A lot of people like to mix their dough in a stand mixer, and use the KitchenAid Pasta Roller & Cutter attachment to finish their pasta. I’ll cover how to use that down below as well.
  • Pasta Drying Racks: Let me be honest, I have a range of them. Rarely use any of them. If I want to save pasta for later I freeze it (details down below). I did buy a stack of these Eppicotispai drying racks, but use them for herbs and chiles more than anything else.
  • Beautiful Pasta Tools: I have a soft spot for beautiful pasta tools, and have assembled a bit of a collection. Some favorites are a traditional garganelli board, and I ask for a new LaGondola brass tool or pasta stamp each Christmas. My fantasy is that I will someday be able to use a mattarello to roll out a perfect sfoglia of uncut pasta. But my reality is that I love my Atlas, my sfolglia adventures are frustrating, and that’s where I’m at in my pasta journey.
  • Spray Bottle & Dough Scraper: I’ll put these two items in the bonus category. They’re nice to have, but not necessary. I like the spray bottle to control the amount of water in my pasta dough. You don’t want your dough to get too wet, the spray bottle allows you to mist it, if necessary, to add hydration a bit at a time. The dough scraper is great for cleaning flour off countertops, wrangling run-away liquids when they break through flour walls, and cutting dough into pieces.

Homemade Pasta Ingredients

  • Flour: You can make homemade pasta with many different flours. Experiment! It’s half the fun. When it comes to pasta I tend to think of flours on a spectrum of silky and fine to hearty and substantial. The type of flour you use will help dictate the personality and “grip” of your noodles, but the idea that you need super specific flours to start making wonderful, beautiful, delicious pasta is no good.
    • All-purpose Flour: There’s seems to be a stigma against using all-purpose flour for homemade pasta, but I actually think it’s a great place to start. Especially if that’s what you have in your pantry right this minute. You end up with silky smooth pasta noodles that I love a number of ways. I like to pair pasta made with all-purpose flour with super simple tomato sauce, drop them into a feisty broth, they’re also great as a curry component (cook them, drain, and ladle curry broth over them). And now that you have a baseline with the all-purpose flour, you can start experimenting by using different ratios of “00”, semolina, and/or whole grain flours. And you’ll notice the differences.
    • “00” flour: Powder-fine grind made with low gluten, soft wheat flour. This is what is used in most of the traditional egg pastas you encounter. It looks and almost feels like powdered sugar.
    • Whole Grain Flours: Each whole-grain flour has it’s own flavor, texture, protein profile, and personality. Play around, starting with a percentage of your overall flour. I generally experiment with flours that will develop gluten – rye, spelt, farro, kamut, or whole wheat. Try 1/2 cup, or if you’re feeling bolder, go for a full cup. The recipe below calls for 2 cups of flour, so that would be half of your overall flour. See how you like it, make notes, adjust. Repeat.
    • Semolina Flour: Made from durum wheat, a hard wheat, using semolina results in a stiffer pasta dough. I like this when I want my pasta to be more toothsome, textured, or more rustic. Track semolina flour down if you want to make the egg-free pasta dough (below). I’ve noticed the grinds can be subtly different between brands, for example Bob’s Red Mill Semolina is a bit sandier when compared to the more powdery Hayden Flour Mills Semolina. I’ve made delicious pasta with both, just note what you like so you can develop your own style and personal preference! When you increase the amount of semolina flour in your dough you’ll need to increase your cooking time.
  • Eggs: My basic, everyday pasta recipe (the one we’re working with today) calls for two eggs. I’ve made lots of pasta with a higher ratio of eggs, and I sometimes make pasta with no egg (see below) — I like two eggs. It lends little richness, color, elasticity and durability to the dough that I find makes the pasta quite versatile. Especially if I’m making a good amount of pasta for freezing later. Meaning, I’m not sure what sort of sauce or preparation I’ll do. Good quality eggs matter here.
  • Extra-virgin Olive Oil: Not everyone uses olive oil in their dough. I use a touch. I feel like it helps keep the dough hydrated, and helps facilitate smooth rolling through the pasta maker rollers if you’re going that route.
  • Fine-grain Sea Salt: You want to salt your pasta dough and your pasta water.

How to Make Pasta with No Eggs

I know a number of you will want to know how to make pasta with no eggs, or vegan pasta dough. No problem. I actually use a dough like this for one of my favorite pasta shapes – pici. You basically cut 1/4-inch strips of dough and roll out by hand. Eggless doughs like this aren’t typically used for pasta noodles like the other ones we’re primarily focusing on today, but for shapes like pici, cavatelli, trofie, and orecchiette. To make a pasta dough with no eggs: Combine 200g “00” flour, 200g semolina flour, 200g warm water, and 1 teaspoon fine grain sea salt. Use these ingredients and proceed with the “How to Make Pasta By Hand” instructions in the recipe section below. There is also an egg free fresh pasta recipe in Rosetta Costantino’s My Calabria made with all-purpose flour.

How To Make Pasta Dough By Hand

This is covered in the recipe below, but I wanted to include some reference pictures and step-by-step information. Start by making a mound of the flour directly on the countertop. Make a deep crater in the top and add the eggs, olive oil, and salt.

Use a fork to break up the eggs without breaking through the walls of your mound. You want to try to keep the eggs contained, but don’t worry if they break through – use a spatula or bench scraper to scoop them back in. Work more and more flour into the eggs a bit at a time. Drizzle 2 tablespoons of cold water across the mixture and keep mixing until you’ve got a dough coming together.

If you’re exclusively using all-purpose flour, you might not need more water. Some of the other flours are a bit thirstier, you can drizzle a bit more at time as you go if you feel like your dough is too dry. It should look like the pictures, you want to avoid having a wet dough. With some of the other flours I typically end up using 4-5 tablespoons of water total.

I’ve found that a spray bottle is my favorite way to add water to pasta dough without adding too much, but drizzling works too. Use your hands to bring the dough together into a bag and knead for 7-10 minutes, until the dough is silky smooth and elastic. You can see the difference in the doughs. The one pictured above hasn’t been kneaded yet, and the one below is pictured after kneading by hand for about ten minutes.

How to Roll and Cut Fresh Pasta By Hand

To roll out pasta dough by hand, make sure your dough is at room temperature. Cut the dough into four equal pieces. Choose one piece to work with, and immediately wrap the rest so they don’t dry out. You’ll need a floured surface, and you’ll want to keep the pasta floured a bit as well, so it doesn’t stick to itself. If the dough is sticking rub with a bit more flour. Use a rolling pin to roll the dough out to your desired thickness. I tend to go thinner than I think I’ll want because the pasta swells a bit as it cooks. Once you’ve rolled the dough out flat, to cut the dough into fettuccine (or whatever width you like), loosely fold/roll the dough into a cylinder, and cut with a sharp knife.

Transfer the cut pasta to a floured baking sheet, swirled into little nests. Repeat with the remaining dough.

How To Roll Out Pasta with A Pasta Maker

Sprinkle a baking sheet generously with flour and aside. When you’re ready to roll out the pasta, make sure your dough is at room temperature. Cut it into six equal wedges, and squish one of them flat-ish with your fingers. Re-wrap the remaining dough immediately so it doesn’t dry out.

Feed your flattened wedge though the pasta make on its widest setting. Run it though 2 or 3 times. You want to get it into a rectangular shape if possible, so at this point fold the dough in thirds so you have a rectangle. Feed it though the pasta maker 2-3 more times on the widest setting.

Continue to feed the pasta dough through the pasta maker, decreasing the width as you go. I run the pasta through a 2-3 times on each width, and dust with a bit of flour on both sides if I’m getting any sticking. The pasta you see pictured here (above and below) was rolled out to 4 on my Atlas 150.

Once your pasta sheet is ready, attach whatever cutter attachment you like, feed the pasta through as you steadily crank. Avoid stopping once you start, and crank steadily. Transfer the cut pasta to a floured baking sheet, swirled into little nests. Repeat with the remaining dough.

How To Make Pasta In A Stand Mixer

First, make the dough. Add the flour, eggs, olive oil, salt and 2 tablespoons of water to the bowl of a stand mixer. Use the dough hook to knead on medium speed for 6-7 minutes. You’ll likely need to add more water, a small splash at a time, just until the dough comes together, you want to avoid an over-wet or sticky dough. See the pictures up above. Mix until the dough looks silky, elastic, and smooth.

Form the dough into a ball and place in a plastic bag. Alternately, you can wrap in plastic wrap. Allow to rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Use Immediately, or refrigerate for up to a day. You might be able to get away with two days, but the dough will start to discolor.

When you’re ready to roll out the pasta, the method is basically an automated version of the hand-cranked traditional pasta maker. Connect the pasta roller attachment to your mixer, and set the adjustment width to its widest setting.

Feed the pasta through a few times at each width, decreasing the width until the pasta reaches your desired thickness. You’ll want to pat the pasta with a bit of flour now and then as you’re working through the thicknesses to avoid any stickiness. And if your pasta is getting too wide, simply fold it in half or thirds and start over at the widest setting again.

Once you have your pasta sheet, swap out the roller attachment for the cutter attachment and feed the dough through the cutter. Transfer the cut pasta to a floured baking sheet, swirled into little nests. Repeat with the remaining dough.

How to Cook Homemade Pasta

When you’re ready to cook the pasta do it in a large pot of well-salted water. Depending on the thickness and shape of your pasta, this might just take a minute or so. Pasta made with a high percentage of semolina flour or whole-grain flours will take a bit longer to cook than pasta made with “00” flour. Reserve a cup or two of the pasta water (in case you want to use it for a sauce), drain the pasta, and use immediately.

How To Take Care of Your Pasta Maker

With a bit of care, your pasta tools should last a lifetime, your pasta maker in particular! I use a pastry brush to dust any flour and dough off my pasta maker ofter each use. It allows me to get into all the creases, seams, and crevices. A slightly damp cloth can help any stubborn spots, but be sure to dry completely before storing. Same goes for any of my wood handled brass stamps and cutters.

How to Freeze Homemade Pasta

Freezing is my preferred method of storing any homemade pasta I’m not using immediately. Arrange freshly made, uncooked pasta across a floured baking sheet. If you’re working with shapes like trofie, garganelli, raviolis, cavatelli, etc. – make sure they’re in a single layer. For longer noodles, fettuccine, pici, spaghetti, etc. – arrange them into nests. Freeze for a couple of hours, and then transfer to double layer plastic bags. You can freeze for up to a couple of months. And you can cook straight from the freezer. No need to thaw, just dump the pasta into boiling salted water, and increase the cooking time a bit.

Cookbooks with Great Information on Making Pasta

I thought I’d list off a few books in my collection that have good chapters or sections about making homemade pasta or inspiration for what you might make with it. I’m sure Im missing a lot (apologies in advance), so if you have a favorite please list in the comments!

  • Flour + Water: Pasta by Thomas McNaughton and Paolo Lucchesi
  • Cooking by Hand by Paul Bertolli
  • Made in Italy: Food & Stories by Giorgio Locatelli – robust pasta chapter.
  • Chez Panisse Pasta, Pizza, & Calzone by Alice Waters
  • My Calabria: Rustic Family Cooking from Italy’s Undiscovered South by Rosetta Costantino with Janet Fletcher. Talks through her eggless dough + preparations.
  • The Classic Italian Cook Book by Marcella Hazan
  • Pasta Grannies: The Secrets of Italy’s Best Home Cooks
  • Anna Del Conte on Pasta
  • Osteria: 1000 Generous Recipes from Italy’s Best Restaurants – there’s a good section on Egg Pasta & Other Handmade Pasta with some wonderful preparations I wasn’t aware of.

Recipes to Make with Fresh Pasta

A few favorite recipes that really sing when you use fresh pasta.

  • Spaghetti with No-Cook Sauce
  • I love them in my favorite vegan ramen (I make them chubby, hand-cut with 100% apf here)
  • Or keep it no-fuss and simply toss homemade pasta with this pesto, this bright and simple tomato sauce, or this creamy crushed walnut magic.

Variations on the Basic Pasta Recipe

Simple Beet Fettuccine: An easy way to make flavor variations is to swap out the water in your pasta recipe with vegetable juice. I love this beet juice-spiked fettuccine, the beets lend a beautiful pink color, and you can play around with how pale or saturated your noodles are by adding more or less beet juice.

You can, of course, substitute other liquids, or use yellow (or orange) beets. If you have success with these noodles, use the recipe as a jumping off point for other flavors. The ratio of eggs to flour in this recipe is slightly different – you can use that, or the one I’m highlighting here. The ideas is the same, swap in strong juice for water in the recipe.

Rye Pasta: And here’s and example of a rye pasta I did a few years back. It’s a nice option for the colder months, it freezes well (so I can make a lot in one go), and you can drop tangles of the noodles into a range of restorative broths.

Shape: Play around with different shapes! You could make pasta ever day for a year, and never have to repeat.

I hope this post has been helpful! Making fresh pasta at home is a simple pleasure that everyone can enjoy whether you’re 8 or 88! xx, -h

Continue reading Homemade Pasta on 101 Cookbooks

Gochujang Ramen with Tofu

I love good quality food, but I also have a small place in my heart reserved for convenience foods like instant ramen or frozen pizzas. I don’t indulge in them often, and when I do I often spruce them up with something special to make them a little more interesting. I’ve posted before about the things I like to add to my instant ramen to give it an upgrade, and now I have a new favorite ingredient—gochujang! This sweet-salty-spicy paste creates a rich broth with plenty of umami that I balanced with some fresh spinach and chunks of mild tofu. This Gochujang Ramen with Tofu is a quick and easy way to indulge that noodle craving!

What is Gochujang?

If you’ve never heard of gochujang, it’s a Korean chile paste made with chile peppers, rice, fermented soybeans, and salt. It kind of reminds me of a spicy version of miso. Gochujang is really starting to trend in the U.S. because of its uniquely sweet-salty-spicy and UMAMI flavor. And because we’re all kind of over our infatuation with sriracha and looking for the next best thing. It’s those fermented soy beans that really set gochujang apart and give whatever you’re adding it to that extra “WOW” factor. So if you haven’t tried it yet, put it on your list!

Where to Buy Gochujang

Because gochujang is really becoming quite popular, you’ll probably be able to find some at most major grocery stores. My local kroger actually carries about 4-5 different kinds! I’m using this Sempio Gochujang. If you have an Asian grocery store near you, you’re sure to find a really good selection there, and probably much better prices. Want to try to make your own? Try this traditional gochujang recipe, or this quickie 5-minute gochujang.

To Use the Ramen Packet or Not to Use the Ramen Packet

Personally, I like to use my own broth when making ramen instead of using the little seasoning packet that comes with the noodles. I like the freedom of tweaking the flavors and salt content, but you can use the seasoning packet if you prefer. Gochujang has quite a bit of salt, so if you do want to use the flavor packet that comes with the instant ramen I suggest adding the gochujang to the water first (3 cups water), then adding a little of the flavor packet at a time until the broth reaches a reasonable salt level for you.

How Spicy is It?

Decently spicy, IMHO. You can reduce the amount of gochujang to make it slightly less spicy, if you prefer. Or, if you’re looking for non-spicy ways to spruce up your ramen, check out my post about 6 Ways to Upgrade Ramen, or my Vegan Creamy Mushroom Ramen.

What Should I Do With my Leftover Tofu?

This recipe uses half of a traditional 14oz. block of tofu. My first choice for using up the other half of the block would be to make a half batch of my Curried Tofu Salad. That stuff is to die for. You could also toss it into a stir fry, or chop it up, add some BBQ sauce and make yourself a BBQ Tofu Slider.

Gochujang ramen with tofu in the sauce pot on a yellow background with a black and white zig-zag napkin.

 
One bowl of gochujang ramen with tofu, chopsticks on the side

Gochujang Ramen with Tofu

Spicy gochujang gives this instant ramen extra oomph! Gochujang Ramen with Tofu is a quick and easy way to satisfy that noodle craving.
Total Cost $2.26 recipe / $1.13 serving
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 2
Calories 322.15kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 7 oz. extra firm tofu $0.90
  • 1 cup water $0.00
  • 2 cups vegetable broth* $0.26
  • 2 Tbsp gochujang $0.46
  • 1 package instant ramen* $0.19
  • 2 cups fresh spinach $0.25
  • 2 green onions $0.20

Instructions

  • Drain the tofu and cut it into 1/2-inch cubes.
  • Add the water, vegetable broth, and gochujang to a small sauce pot. Whisk until the gochujang is dissolved.
  • Add the cubed tofu to the pot, place a lid on top, and bring it up to a boil over high heat.
  • Once boiling, add the instant ramen noodles (without seasoning). Boil for one to two minutes, or just until the noodles begin to soften and pull loose from each other.
  • Add two handfuls (about 2 cups) fresh spinach and stir it into the hot broth until wilted. The noodles will finish cooking as the spinach wilts.
  • Slice the green onions and sprinkle over top of the ramen just before serving.

Notes

*If using vegetable broth, discard the seasoning packet that comes with the ramen noodles. If using the seasoning packet, use 3 cups of water instead of 1 cup water and 2 cups vegetable broth. Add the gochujang to the water first, then add a small amount of the seasoning packet at a time until you reach the desired level of saltiness for the broth.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 322.15kcal | Carbohydrates: 37.55g | Protein: 15.9g | Fat: 12.6g | Sodium: 1347.35mg | Fiber: 3.1g

side view of a bowl of gochujang ramen with chopsticks picking up a piece of tofu

How to Make Gochujang Ramen with Tofu – Step by Step Photos

cubed tofu on a cutting board

Drain a 14oz. block of tofu and cut half of it into ½-inch cubes. See the notes above the recipe for ideas for using the remaining tofu.

Gochujang broth in a small sauce pot with a whisk, tub of gochujang on the side

Add 1 cup water, 2 cups vegetable broth, and 2 Tbsp gochujang to a small sauce pot. Whisk until the gochujang has dissolved.

Cubed tofu being dropped into the pot

Add the cubed tofu to the pot. Adding the tofu before we start boiling the broth gives it a few minutes to start absorbing some of the flavor from the broth, as opposed to adding it at the end. Place a lid on the pot and bring the broth up to a boil over high heat.

Ramen noodles added to the pot, empty package on the side

Once boiling, add the block of instant ramen noodles (without seasoning packet). Let the noodles boil for about a minute, or just until they being to soften up and loosen up from the block.

Spinach added to the pot

Add a couple handfuls of spinach to the pot and stir it in until wilted. This should give the noodles just enough time to finish cooking as well.

Finished gochujang ramen in the pot

Slice two green onions and sprinkle them over the ramen just before serving.

One bowl of gochujang ramen with tofu, chopsticks on the side

Enjoy that spicy goodness!!

The post Gochujang Ramen with Tofu appeared first on Budget Bytes.

The Best Tomato Pie

Filled with creamy mayonnaise and cheddar cheese mixture layered in between thick sliced of summer tomatoes makes this The Best Tomato Pie. There’s no better way to close out summer than making this delicious southern recipe.

Tomato season is underway and creating a dinner that is fresh with tomatoes is at the top of the list. Try this sausage tomato gnocchi, creamy tomato basil chicken or creamy tomato Italian parmesan chicken for more tomato recipes.

The Best Tomato Pie

Growing up in Alabama, Tomato Pie was a summer staple and one we enjoyed often. It’s Aimee here from the site Aimee Mars and southern recipes are my specialty. The basic ingredients in this simple and delicious recipe are mainly the same for all, but there are several different ways to prepare it. One this is for certain though, every end of summer should include this delicious recipe.

Ingredients in Tomato Pie

This savory pie is made of just a few basic ingredients, most of which you probably have on hand. The key is choosing super firm tomatoes, whether they come from your own garden, farmers market, or your local grocery store. Use your fingertips to gently squeeze the tomatoes to test their firmness.

  • 9-inch pie shell: you can use a store-bought pie shell if you’re looking to make this recipe quickly or you can make a delicious one of your own like this buttermilk pie crust.
  • 6 Tomatoes, large and very ripe: the firmer the tomatoes the better. If the tomatoes are too soft they’ll have way too much moisture, which will make your pie soggy.
  • Salt: this is just a basic salt for coating the tomatoes before adding them to the recipe, it helps to drain any additional water.
  • Fresh Basil: basil and tomato were meant to go together and putting this fresh ingredient in tomato pie are no different. I highly recommend using fresh basil if you can find it.
  • Freshly Shredded Cheddar Cheese: you can use already shredded cheddar cheese for this recipe, but shredded your own makes it slightly softer and so it melts perfectly together into the pie.
  • Mayonnaise: this key ingredient slightly holds this pie together and adds some delicious flavor.
  • Seasoning: salt, pepper, and garlic powder and the main spices for this recipe, however, you can easily add in some more such as paprika and chili powder if you like a spicier version.

Tomato pie in a white pie dish with fresh basil on top

How to Make Tomato Pie

  1. Prepare the Tomatoes: slice the tomatoes about 1/4-inch in thickness and lay them flat in a single layer on a paper towel-lined baking sheet. Cover the tomatoes in salt and then a top layer of paper towels and let sit for 10 minutes.
  2. Mix the Base: In a large bowl combine the shredded cheese, mayonnaise, fresh basil, and seasoning until fully combined.
  3. Arrange: place your desired pie shell into a pie dish and begin to arrange the pie by layering a single layer of tomatoes on the bottom. Then spread half of the cheese mixture on top of the tomatoes. Place another layer of tomatoes, overlapping some, on top, and repeat with the remaining cheese mixture. Finish layering the pie with some tomatoes on top. Firmly press the tomatoes in so the mixture comes together. Sprinkle some additional basil on top if desired.
  4. Bake: Place the pie in a pre-heated oven at 350º F and bake for 35 to 45 minutes, until the cheese becomes bubbly.




Which Tomatoes are Best for Tomato Pie?

The standard beefsteak or plum tomatoes work best for tomato pie because they’re not as juicy as tomatoes such as heirloom. Make sure to choose tomatoes that are firm to touch and not soft. If you really want to use heirloom tomatoes then you absolutely can, just also make sure they’re super firm. If you choose tomatoes that are too soft it will be hard to remove the water content and your pie will turn out soggy.

Can I use a Store-Bought Pie Crust?

Yes! If you’re short on time or just don’t want to hassle with making a crust then a store-bought crust will work just as well. There is one trick I always like to use though, and that’s to double up the crust. Purchase a dough that comes with two shells and layer one right on top of the other in your pie dish. This makes for an extra thick crust.

Slice of tomato pie on a white dish

What to Serve with Tomato Pie:

This pie is surprisingly filling, and since it’s a summer recipe it pairs perfectly with the most traditional side dishes. Some of my favorites are listed below.

  • Summer Corn Salad
  • Grilled Ceasar Salad
  • Baked Beans
  • Classic Potato Salad
  • Classic Deviled Eggs
  • Strawberry, Pear, and Apple Spinach Salad

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The Best Tomato Pie

Filled with creamy mayonnaise and cheddar cheese mixture layered in between thick sliced of summer tomatoes makes this The Best Tomato Pie. There’s no better way to close out summer than making this delicious southern recipe.
Course Dinner
Cuisine American, Southern
Keyword tomato pie
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings 10 Servings
Calories 279kcal
Author Aimee Mars

Ingredients

  • 1 9-inch Pie Shell
  • 6 large Tomatoes very ripe
  • 1 tablespoon Salt
  • 8 ounces Shredded Cheddar Cheese
  • 1/2 cup Mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup Fresh Basil chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon Garlic Powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF and if making prepare the pie dough.

Prepare the Tomatoes:

  • Slice the tomatoes to about 1/4-inch in thickness and arrange them in a single layer on a paper towel-lined baking sheet. Coat the tomatoes in salt and cover again with another layer of paper towels. Let sit for 10 minutes.

Make the Filling:

  • In a medium bowl combine the shredded cheese, mayonnaise, fresh basil, and spices together until mixed well. Set aside.

Arrange the Pie:

  • Place the 9-inch pie shell into your pie dish and arrange a single layer of sliced tomatoes on the bottom. Cover the tomatoes with half of the cheese mixture and repeat this step.
  • Layer the last of the tomato slices on top, overlapping is okay, and firmly press them into the pie. This helps the ingredients come together.

Bake:

  • Place the pie into the oven and bake for 35 to 45 minutes, until the cheese begins to bubble and the crust turns a golden brown.

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 279kcal | Carbohydrates: 14g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 29mg | Sodium: 1055mg | Potassium: 300mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 1176IU | Vitamin C: 15mg | Calcium: 179mg | Iron: 1mg

Strawberry Cake – really easy cake recipe

This Strawberry Cake is just about the quickest and easiest cake you will ever make. Loaded with 500g / 1 lb of strawberries IN and ON the cake, it’s a great way to use strawberries when they’re in season! Yogurt makes the crumb moist, it’s not too sweet and you’ll love the hint of lemon.

No stand mixer, no creaming butter. Just one bowl and a wooden spoon!

Strawberry cake

A pink sponge cake with pink frosting made entirely with fresh strawberries without cheating* is a recipe that’s officially been in development for 3 years.

I’m confident 2020 will be The Year when I finally crack it. I’m getting close – and I’m SUPER excited to share it with you.  And while infinitely doable by any home cook, it is quite an involved recipe.

So for now, here’s the cake you make with all those strawberries – the best easy cake recipe you will ever make bursting with fresh strawberries!

* No cheating = no food colouring, no strawberry flavouring, no fancy pants ingredients like freeze dried strawberries.

Slice of Easy Strawberry Cake with cream and fresh strawberries

Close up showing soft moist crumb of Easy Strawberry Cake

The cake is made with a yogurt and oil based batter which keeps the crumb beautifully moist for days and gives it more structure than delicate sponge cakes made with creamed butter so it can stand up to the weight and considerable juices that sweat out of the strawberries.

It’s still a beautifully soft crumb, it’s just not as delicate as traditional butter and sponge cakes. I’ve used it for Blueberry Cake and this Lemon Yogurt Cake if you’d like to read feedback from people who have tried it (spoiler: it’s good!)


What goes in Strawberry Cake

So here’s what you need:

Ingredients in Strawberry Cake

How to make this easy Strawberry Cake

Being that this doesn’t have creamed butter in it, it’s a one-bowl, hand mixed batter. Whisk Wet ingredients first, then mix the dry in.

How to make Strawberry Cake

Some of the strawberries go inside the cake – not too much, I was a little overenthusiastic about this at first but the strawberries made the batter so wet and weighed it down so much it took 100 minutes to cook! Most go on top – they hold their form pretty well but the burst with juice when you bite into them.

Close up of slice of Easy Strawberry Cake

Overhead photo of Strawberry Cake being served

I’m so unoriginal that whenever I see strawberries and baked goods, and I immediately think cream. So for me, a (big!) dollop of freshly whipped cream is mandatory for serving.

Though recently, I really showed my wild side when I served it warm with ice cream – and it was to die for. As with most cakes, the inside is a little “pudding like” when it’s still warm from the oven (hence why most cake recipe sternly instruct you to be patient and let the cake cook fully before serving).

But for this Strawberry Cake, that “pudding like” texture with the warm strawberries just seemed to enhance the eating experience. Especially with that (adventurous! risky!) scoop of ice cream I plonked on the side.

It’s terrific both ways – at room temp OR warm. You choose! – Nagi x


Watch how to make it

Close up of strawberry cake recipe

Print

Strawberry Cake (really easy cake recipe)

Recipe video above. With 500g / 1lb strawberries IN and ON the cake, this really is bursting with fresh strawberry flavour! This may well be the fastest and easiest cake recipe you’ll make this year. Yogurt keeps the crumb beatifully tender and moist, and it keeps perfectly for days.

Lovely served at room temperature with cream, or warm with ice cream (I love it both ways!).

Course Cake
Cuisine Western
Keyword easy cake recipe, strawberry cake, strawberry recipe
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Servings 10 – 12 slices
Author Nagi

Ingredients

Strawberries

  • 500g / 1 lb strawberries , hulled (ie tops removed)

WET:

  • 1 cup sugar , caster/superfine best but granulated ok too
  • 1/2 cup oil , canola or vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs , large (~50g/1.75 oz each)
  • 1 1/2 tbsp grated lemon rind
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice (1 large lemon)
  • 1 cup plain yoghurt , unsweetened (Greek or just plain)

DRY:

  • 2 1/4 cups flour , plain/all purpose
  • 4 tsp baking powder (Note 2 for baking soda / bi carb)
  • Pinch of salt

SERVING:

  • Whipped cream
  • Extra strawberries
  • Icing sugar/ powdered sugar , for dusting

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 200°C/390°F (180°C fan).
  • Grease and line a 23 cm / 9″ cake with baking paper/parchment paper.

Strawberries:

  • For inside of cake: Dice some strawberries into ~1.5cm / 1″ pieces to make 1 cup (about 1/3 of the strawberries)
  • Topping: Cut the remaining strawberries in half.

Cake:

  • Place Wet ingredients in a bowl and whisk well for 1 minute.
  • Add Dry ingredients then whisk well until lump free.
  • Pour half into cake pan, smooth surface. Scatter over diced strawberries.
  • Top with remaining batter. Smooth surface, then top with halved strawberries, cut face down.
  • Bake 50 minutes or until skewer inserted into centre comes out clean. (Note 1) If you need to cook longer, cover with foil if it starts getting too golden.
  • Stand 15 minutes in the cake pan before turning out onto cooling rack.
  • Cool 15 minutes+ before serving warm or at room temp. Dust with icing sugar, and serve with cream or if serving warm, ice cream!

Notes

1. Bake time – if your oven runs weak so it takes longer to bake, it can really affect the bake time of this cake due to the juiciness of the strawberries! At 180°C/350°F (160°C fan) it took me 30 minutes longer, and a bit more moist inside (but still a terrific soft tender crumb).

Originally published as this Upside Down Strawberry Cake in August 2017 which, due to lack of reader interest (ie virtually ZERO readers!) and some technicality issues, has been replaced with this sparkling new easy Strawberry Cake recipe!

Life of Dozer

When the video camera kept focussing on his big golden head instead of the darn cake!!!

Dozer strawberry cake

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